Reviews for Sand River are here!

The Shocker, the alumni magazine of WSU, has included Sand River and Other Places I’ve Been on their Shocker bookshelf!  Go here to read the review (along with Rob Grave’s Nightmarism-just keep scrolling down).

Now that you’ve read that review, here are two more!

From poet Michele Battiste

Nothing is what you expect it to be in the places that April Pameticky has been. And yet, after she reveals the truth of things, you say to yourself, “of course.” Of course courage is “a sister-cluster of dryer lint and dirt.” And certainly grief eats cereal straight from the box while it snuggles next to you on the couch. Pameticky takes us through the looking glass, where a world often considered pleasant but banal – the world of wife and mother and middle school teacher – is transformed into a darker, dangerous, but far more fascinating realm.

Michele Battiste is the author of the poetry collections Ink for an Odd Cartography (2009) and Uprising (2013), both from Black Lawrence Press. She is also the author of four chapbooks, the latest of which is Lineage (Binge Press, 2012). Her work has appeared in American Poetry Review, Anti-, The Awl, Mid-American Review, and Women’s Studies Quarterly. She lives in Boulder, CO where she raises funds for nonprofits undoing corporate evil.

From poet John Jenkinson

Generous, smart, and musical, April Pameticky’s first chapbook, Sand River and Other Places I’ve Been, presents the reader with a Baedeker of the heart. From Sand River to Blackwell, middle-school to “the corner,” “from elm to oak,” Pameticky’s poetry vibrates with wit, intelligence, and a lively lyric voice given to stunning turns of phrase and wry observation. “The truth is not always true,” urges the poet, as she strokes us “to a mild whimper” – or a wild roar of realization. April Pameticky is real – each poem “a fist landed with precision,” and this brief collection, Sand River and Other Places I’ve Been, a necessary and welcome addition to the 21st century bookshelf.
John Jenkinson, author, REBEKAH ORDERS LASAGNA

Jenkinson has received an AWP Intro Journals award, the Ellipses Prize, a New Voices Award, a Balticon Science Fiction Award, and awards from Kansas Voices.  His work appears in a variety of journals and anthologies including Slipstream and The Mennonite. He has published several chapbooks with B.G.S., Hard Knocks, and Basilisk presses, and his first full-length collection, Rebekah Orders Lasagna, has just appeared from Woodley Press.

Buying Sand River and Other Places I’ve Been

Convinced? Travel here to put your order in directly to Finishing Line Press for Sand River and Other Places I’ve Been.  Help me ensure a large and significant print run. Did I mention that it’s my birthday?

Prompt #29: Paying Homage

As April draws to a close, I find this nearly-last prompt bittersweet.  While I am enthused to begin revising my new body of work, I have enjoyed simply responding to the prompts with no direction other than inspiration.  I think we are often too busy writing ‘productively,’ that we forget to write for the joy of it.

Prompt #29: Paying Homage

Do you have a favorite poem?  Something that speaks to your heart, always giving you a little zing every time you read it?

For me, just about anything by Khalil Gibran moves me.  I realize that his poetry may have fallen out of ‘fashion,’ or worse, that modern poets find him sentimental.  That doesn’t change the way his work moves me.

Consider your own favorite poem [I realize you may have to narrow your search down arbitrarily].

Then choose a line.  Use it as the first line of your new poem.

I liked the line “Humanity rages like a tempest, but I sigh in silence,” from Gribran.  Feel free to search through http://www.poemhunter.com/ and http://www.poets.org/index.php .

Prompt #28: In the Company of Strangers

Prompt #28: In the Company of Strangers…

Robert Lee Brewer’s Poetic Asides Blog #200

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/wednesday-poetry-prompts-200

“Take the phrase ‘In the Company of [blank],’ and replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then write your poem.  Possible titles might include: “In the Company of Strangers,” “In the Company of Poets,” and “In the Company of Abraham Lincoln.”

Prompt #27: The Journey

When you saw today’s prompt, did you immediately think to yourself, “Don’t Stop Believing?” Hmmm, maybe you can use that energy! Don’t forget that you can share your work in the comment section or by emailing me.  You can also ‘like’ my new facebook author page at: http://www.facebook.com/pages/April-Pameticky-author/515829111789234

Prompt #27: The Journey

luggageI am a terrible traveler.  I want to BE THERE ALREADY.  It doesn’t matter if it’s a road trip to Texas, or a flight to California.  While vaguely intrigued by the idea of taking a train, I am realistic enough to know that I’ll probably dislike that as well.  Is there a trip in your past worth revisiting?  Is it really, then, the journey that matters, not the destination?

Prompt # 24: Letters You Never Send

Prompt #24: Letters You Never Send

Several years ago, I began my own little series of poems called “Letters I never send.”  This gave me an outlet to address people that irritated me or did me ‘wrong.’  Often, these letters were written to people who were relatively anonymous.

Here’s an example:

Dear Burger King Drive-thru Guy,

Thank you for not including
napkins.  I don’t know why I
even bother to ask for them.
I never need them when I drip
Whopper dribble on my lap,
you know, on my way to that
important meeting where I want
people to take me seriously.

You can also take on a much more serious tone, writing a letter to someone that you never intend to send because of all the complications that would result.  You could even take on the persona of another person, writing a letter you imagine they would send.