Prompt #29: Paying Homage

As April draws to a close, I find this nearly-last prompt bittersweet.  While I am enthused to begin revising my new body of work, I have enjoyed simply responding to the prompts with no direction other than inspiration.  I think we are often too busy writing ‘productively,’ that we forget to write for the joy of it.

Prompt #29: Paying Homage

Do you have a favorite poem?  Something that speaks to your heart, always giving you a little zing every time you read it?

For me, just about anything by Khalil Gibran moves me.  I realize that his poetry may have fallen out of ‘fashion,’ or worse, that modern poets find him sentimental.  That doesn’t change the way his work moves me.

Consider your own favorite poem [I realize you may have to narrow your search down arbitrarily].

Then choose a line.  Use it as the first line of your new poem.

I liked the line “Humanity rages like a tempest, but I sigh in silence,” from Gribran.  Feel free to search through http://www.poemhunter.com/ and http://www.poets.org/index.php .

Prompt # 24: Letters You Never Send

Prompt #24: Letters You Never Send

Several years ago, I began my own little series of poems called “Letters I never send.”  This gave me an outlet to address people that irritated me or did me ‘wrong.’  Often, these letters were written to people who were relatively anonymous.

Here’s an example:

Dear Burger King Drive-thru Guy,

Thank you for not including
napkins.  I don’t know why I
even bother to ask for them.
I never need them when I drip
Whopper dribble on my lap,
you know, on my way to that
important meeting where I want
people to take me seriously.

You can also take on a much more serious tone, writing a letter to someone that you never intend to send because of all the complications that would result.  You could even take on the persona of another person, writing a letter you imagine they would send.

Prompt # 18: Form

Prompt# 18: Form

Recently someone asked me how to become a poet.  I answered honestly: I have no idea.  I just started writing.  Then I read.  Then I thought about what I had read.  Then I read some more. And finally I went back to writing.

I realize that there are ‘rules’ to writing poems and a demonstrable respect for words.  However, most modern poetry in the U.S., and probably written by those having fun with these prompts, does not follow traditional form.  So with that in mind, and to flex our sometimes unused poetry muscles, let’s write a poem using a traditional form.

Having trouble remembering those rules?  Click here: http://www.poets.org/page.php/prmID/197

The Pantoum, sestina, and villanelle all provide interesting avenues for exploration, especially if you consider yourself a free-verse poet.  Structure can provide boundaries to language.  Follow the link for a more complete guide to various forms and select one that you’ve never tried before.  Rather than prompt you with content, I encourage you to find a form for today.

Prompt #6: A Room of Your Own

You may email your responses directly to me at aprilpameticky@hotmail.com, or leave your efforts in the comment section below each day’s prompt.  I would be happy to share work and links back to bloggers and poets that have decided to participate.
 
Many of you may already have a poem or piece that fits the prompt, but try to write and share something new.  Flex muscles.  Write.  You can always revise later.

Prompt #6: A Room of Your Own

bathroomWhat is your favorite room in your home?  For me, it is definitely the bathroom. I know, you’re thinking that’s bizarre, but it’s private and relaxing.  I’ve even been known to read books in the bathtub.  Thankfully, friends suggested that I put my Kindle in a Ziploc bag in case I slipped up.  Try to describe your favorite room, either from your childhood home or in the place you are currently living.  What is it about that space that makes it so special?

PS: That is totally NOT my actual bathroom.  If it was, I would live there.

Prompt #3: Parenthood

April is National Poetry Month.  For fun, and in honor of great poetry the world over, I’ll provide a writing prompt each day.  Feel free to respond to the prompt, or ignore it if it doesn’t suit you.  The goal here is to write a little every day, if for no other reason than to experience the joy of writing.  I imagine that not every prompt will inspire a full poem, but like Natalie Goldberg espouses, we’re going to write for the practice of writing. 
 
If you would like, you may email your responses directly to me at aprilpameticky@hotmail.com, or leave your efforts in the comment section below each day’s prompt.  I would be happy to share work and links back to bloggers and poets that have decided to participate.
 
Many of you may already have a poem or piece that fits the prompt, but try to write and share something new.  Flex muscles.  Write.  You can always revise later.

Prompt #3: Parenthood

Motherhood has been the most significant moment of my life, but it was something I dreamed of long before I was ever pregnant. Having said that, I have a number of friends that NEVER want to be parents, and I can respect that desire.  Write a poem about your own feelings on the subject.

And just for fun… my poem, while not new, did inspire the prompt:
(I am hoping to write a new one for today’s prompt)

“She Sleeps”
I am  not afraid of the dark,
but fear silence too long still.
I reach out in the night,
across cool cotton sheets,
check her tiny, sleeping form
a half-dozen times. If she is
quiet beyond my inhale, my
breath stops, my heart tripping.
I stroke her to a mild whimper
just to be sure that she lives
beyond today, maybe to be a
prom date, or a graduate student,
or a mother in her own right.
I think of my mother lying still
and listening with her whole body
for a tiny mew in the darkness.

To visit that previous post: https://aprilpameticky.wordpress.com/2011/07/11/she-sleeps/